The Dressmakers Series

In Lord Perfect, Book #3 of the Carsington series, I introduced the Dreadful Deluceys, a notorious lot of liars, frauds, and swindlers. And the idea of the Dreadful DeLuceys promptly got a stranglehold on my imagination. What about the rest of the family, the ones living abroad? Imagination wondered.

Eventually the imaginings settled down to one family, whose premise was, What if one of the Dreadful DeLuceys married her French counterpart?

The result, in my fevered brain, was a series about this couple’s offspring, a trio of purveyors of high fashion in the 1830s. The Noirot sisters have come to London determined to conquer the dressmaking trade—and they’ve got the imagination, wile, guile, and audacity to succeed. They're brilliant, they're ambitious, and—being descended from two of Europe's most disreputable aristocratic families—they're short on scruples. Herein expect to encounter fabulous clothes, gorgeous men, and, of course, extremely devious, ambitious women.

Vixen in Velvet

Vixen in Velvet

Scandal Wears Satin

Scandal Wears Satin

Silk Is For Seduction

Silk Is For Seduction


The Carsington Brothers series

 The Right Honorable Edward Junius Carsington, Earl of Hargate, had five sons, which was three more than he needed. Since Providence—with some help from his wife—had early blessed him with a robust heir and an equally healthy spare, he’d rather the last three infants had been daughters.

This was because his lordship, unlike many of his peers, had a morbid aversion to accumulating debt, and everyone knows that sons, especially a nobleman’s sons, are beastly expensive.  
—excerpt from Miss Wonderful

My original plan for the Carsington series was a trilogy dealing with the three pesky younger sons, and Lord Hargate’s machinations to get them married to rich girls. But like so many cunning plans, this one went astray:  As of today, the trilogy comprises five books. Only the second eldest son, Geoffrey, has stayed happily married as originally envisioned. Having never given me a troubling thought, he neatly eluded being the hero of one of my books—and thus spared himself a great deal of suffering.

Miss Wonderful

Miss Wonderful

Not Quite A Lady

Not Quite A Lady

Mr Impossible

Mr Impossible

Last Nights Scandal

Last Nights Scandal

Lord Perfect

Lord Perfect


The Fallen Women series

One of the things that infuriated me about the 19th century novels I otherwise loved was that any woman who strayed from the extremely narrow path of virtue—no matter what the reason or extenuating circumstances—came to a bad end.

So I rewrote those sorts of stories, and gave my bad girls—a courtesan and a harem escapee—Happily Ever Afters.

In fact, two other books, Not Quite a Lady (definitely) and Last Night’s Scandal (well, it’s a stretch), fit the category. But since they truly belong in the Carsington series, it seemed unnecessarily confusing to put them in this grouping as wel.

 

 

Your Scandalous Ways

Your Scandalous Ways

Don't Tempt Me

Don't Tempt Me

 

Débauchés (aka Historical) (aka Scoundrels) series

This series never really had a title because, unlike the Carsingtons and the Dressmakers, it wasn’t planned as a series. But then I became intrigued with a character, Ismal, which led to Captives of the Night, then two more full-length books and a novella, in all of which familiar characters make appearances, sometimes in starring roles, sometimes not.

All of the heroes are in dire need of love’s transforming effect, most obviously Lord Dain of Lord of Scoundrels, the centerpiece of the group and a longstanding reader favorite.

It makes perfect sense to me, then, that some people call this lot the Scoundrels series. But I’ve decided to use the less easy-to-pronounce (I can mangle it like nobody’s business) but extremely apt title my French publisher gave it.

The Lion's Daughter

The Lion's Daughter

The Last Hellion

The Last Hellion

Captives of the Night

Captives of the Night

"The Mad Earl's Bride"

"The Mad Earl's Bride"

Lord of Scoundrels

Lord of Scoundrels


Traditional Regencies

These are the first six books I ever wrote. The traditional Regency is the reason I got into writing romance. I won’t say I can’t write serious, but it would be uphill work. Mine is a comic muse, and Regencies offered a prime opportunity to combine two loves: 19th C English history and screwball comedy. Too, witty banter being highly prized in the genre, I could hone my dialogue skills.

These are shorter books—about the length of one of my historical romances if you cut out all the smoochy parts. About the steamiest it gets (explicitly) is a passionate kiss. As you might expect under the circumstances, sexual tension abounds.

The first four books work out to two pairs connected by common characters. The last two were written to stand alone.

Isabella

Isabella

The Devil's Delilah

The Devil's Delilah

The English Witch

The English Witch

Knaves' Wager

Knaves' Wager

Viscount Vagabond

Viscount Vagabond

The Sandalwood Princess

The Sandalwood Princess


Anthologies

 
"The Mad Earl's Bride" in Three Times A Bride

"The Mad Earl's Bride" in Three Times A Bride

"Lord Lovedon's Duel" in Royal Bridesmaids

"Lord Lovedon's Duel" in Royal Bridesmaids

"The Jilting of Lord Northwick" in Royal Weddings

"The Jilting of Lord Northwick" in Royal Weddings