News from here and abroad, including Brazil & Portugal

It's been a while, and I have a lot of catching up to do. For instance, what have I been doing all this time since May? For one thing, I was in Europe: a month living in London, a week in Albania, a week in Italy, then back to London and home again, home again. Where the page proofs for A Duke in Shining Armor awaited me.

Page proofs are my last chance to correct errors and crazy, twitchy stuff I can't believe I did, which nobody else caught for some reason. Things like using a certain phrase over and over. This happens in every book, and it's always a different phrase, and every single time, I don't pick up on it until the page proofs come. This may have to do with seeing pages that actually look like book pages, rather than typed manuscript pages. Or it could be my brain. Because. You know.

But the page proofs have gone their merry way, and everything seems on time for the December 2017 release of my first Difficult Dukes book. There will be some public appearances connected with this, which I will tell you about when details are confirmed. Suffice to say that they will involve some of my favorite author friends, and I am very excited.

Also, before long I'll be reporting on my travels abroad. I would have reported while abroad, but the technology issues became daunting. It was all I could do to get a few Two Nerdy History Girl posts in here and there. And yes, I was very busy trying not to waste one fabulous minute, which left not much time or brain power for social media.

Until then, for your visual enjoyment, here are some lovely new editions to look at, from Brazil and Portugal, of Vixen in Velvet.

 

A Duke in Shining Armor has a cover and a website page and everything

The cover for my latest book, scheduled for release on 28 November,  appeared on the online bookstores a while ago, but since I had no advance warning, and life here is busy, my website update didn’t happen simultaneously.

By now, if you’ve looked up A Duke in Shining Armor online, you’ve seen the synopsis that appears on the back cover. Now, though, it has its own page here on my website, where you can read an excerpt as well.

A Duke in Shining Armor is the first of a planned trilogy titled Difficult Dukes. This one is the Duke of Ripley’s story. But in it you’ll also meet the other two members of the trio known as Their Dis-Graces: the Dukes of Blackwood and Ashmont, whose stories I’ll tell in the next books.

For those who wonder if the Dressmakers will make an appearance: I set the book in 1833, a couple of years before the Dressmakers series (1835-1836). Since I'd taken that story arc as far as it would go, I wanted to start fresh. From the writing standpoint, it makes things simpler when I don’t have to worry about events in previous books interfering with or contradicting events in the plot of the current one. It's less stressful, too, if I don't have to account for characters from previous books. Still, you might recognize a name or or two from the Dressmakers books, and a young person whose life has included at least two aliases. For the most part, though, it’s all new people.

In a few weeks, I’ll be heading to England for an extended period of research and inspiration-seeking. If all goes well with the technology, you can expect me to report, though probably not as regularly as a less confused person would do.

If you haven’t already subscribed to the Loretta Chase website blog, you might want to consider it. Since my newsletters go out only once or twice a year, the blog is the best way to keep up-to-date with releases, appearances, adventures, and information that I hope will enhance your enjoyment of my books. The subscription link is in the upper right corner of the blog page.

 

New Year, New Book

Happy New Year!

That’s a bit late, and so, by way of explanation, let me begin with P.G. Wodehouse’s Cocktail Time.
Told he must write another book, to build on the phenomenal success of his first, Sir Raymond (aka “Beefy”) Bastable responds,

“But I can’t, I tell you! It nearly killed me, writing Cocktail Time. You haven’t any conception what it means to sweat your way through one of these damned books. I daresay it’s all right for fellows who are used to it, but for somebody like myself…I’d much rather be torn to pieces with red-hot pincers.”

I’m here to tell you that even some of us who are used to it fully understand Beefy’s sentiments, although we may not be quite ready to be torn to pieces with red-hot pincers.

In short, as Wodehouse points out earlier in the book, “there is a lot more to this writing business than the casual observer would suppose.” I was comforted to learn that even he, who not only wrote hundreds of books but also screenplays, songs, magazine articles, short stories, and so on, at the rate of what seems to be 200 a day, did not write as effortlessly as his works would make it appear.

All of this is an overlong prelude to the question: When is the next book coming out?

Not being nearly as prolific as he was despite the difficulties he speaks of so poignantly, I am in the last stages of the Work-In-(snail-like) Progress. If I finish it within the next few weeks, it will be out in November of this year. I seem to have a prayer of accomplishing this. Please send as much positive thinking my way as you can. I am not ashamed to ask.

Images, from top: The Important Response, Florent Joseph Marie Willems, courtesy the Walters Art Museum; cover of Cocktail Time (scanned from my copy); telegram from Dorothy Parker to her editor, courtesy Letters of Note (with thanks to Susan Holloway Scott/Isabella Bradford, who first forwarded the telegram image to me).

Clicking on the image will enlarge it.  Clicking on the caption will take you to the source, where you can learn more and enlarge images as needed.

 

Australia & New Zealand & eBooks & Audio

My long-suffering readers in Australia and New Zealand have enquired about audio books. Once again we face that dreaded world of contracts and licenses.

I'm going to simply outline the complications, rather than get into the bewildering details, where I’m bound to get something wrong or incoherent. Basically, it’s a question of contracts, and who has rights/licenses to do what where.

It’s complicated because one set of my books will have one set of non-U.S. licensing arrangements for print/audio/eBooks/etc., and another set will have different ones. Also, publishing conditions change—these days, very rapidly—and what was an excellent contractual/licensing decision in, say 2012, turns out to have powerful rivals in 2015. Also, and to our great frustration, there seems to be some kind of lag time between release in the U.K. and release in Australia and New Zealand.

In every case, my agents are working to get the best publishing arrangement for all concerned—readers as well as author. This takes some research as well as negotiating.

However, they're researching and negotiating as I write this, and you can expect me to report progress here as it’s reported to me. To keep up-to-date, you might want to click on the link at the upper right of this page, and subscribe to the blog. That way, it will arrive in your inbox and spare your trawling over the website or the internet to find out what in blazes is going on.

Image: Thomas Rowlandson, Merchant's Office (1789), courtesy Yale Center for British Art.